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Digital Scholar Training Initiative

Helping Researchers Better Utilize the Web

Become a Successful Digital Scholar

Workshop 1

Video and Slides

Introductory Lecture
Training Slides
Slides
Video Invitation
Video Invitation

Workshop Description

In this workshop, we will provide an overview of Digital Scholarship and explore examples of scholars who have successfully used digital approaches to advance their research and careers.

Instructor

Katja Reuter, PhD, director of Digital Strategies and the electronic Home program, Southern California Clinical and Translational Science Institute (SC CTSI)

Recommended Reading

FAQ

  • Will I get a certificate after completing this workshop?

    Upon request, participants who complete individual workshops or the entire series will receive a certificate signed by Jonathan M. Samet, MD, MS, Distinguished Professor and Flora L. Thornton Chair, Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Director, USC Institute for Global Health, Director of the SC CTSI Education, Career Development, and Ethics program, and lead instructor Katja Reuter, PhD, director of Digital Strategy and the eHome program at SC CTSI.

  • What resources will I need for this workshop?

    Please bring your computer and your phone. You will need Internet access.

  • What tools will we be using in this workshop?

    We will introduce several web-based approaches to scholarship including social media tools.

Templates

Leverage Science Crowdfunding

Workshop 2

Training Video and Slides

Training Video
Training Slides
Slides

Workshop Description

In this workshop, you will learn how to leverage crowdfunding to obtain seed funding. Science crowdfunding is an alternative approach that couples storytelling, fundraising, outreach and networking. Scientists in academia and the private sector have already successfully used it to supplement and substitute grants.

Participants will get an overview of various crowdfunding approaches and receive hands-on training, allowing them to apply the new knowledge to advance their specific research and career goals. The training will have a special focus on clinical and translational health sciences.

To raise seed funding, you will have the opportunity to develop a crowdfunding campaign with the Experiment team, post your campaign on the Experiment online platform and get marketing support to help achieve your funding goals.

Instructors

Syllabus

During the workshop

  1. Defining Crowdfunding
    • Introduction: What is crowdfunding, and how does it work for science research?
    • Underlying dynamics of success and failure among crowdfunding campaigns
    • Typical projects well-suited to crowdfunding for science
    • Case studies of campaigns that have succeeded in raising substantial funds and/or creating engaging content
  2. Developing a Crowdfunding Campaign
    • Understanding the components of a crowdfunding campaign
    • Public disclosure and intellectual property rules
    • Budgeting and the all-or-nothing (AON) funding model
    • Using language for a non-scientific audience that gets people to donate
    • Understanding activity and promotion on social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, etc.
    • Talking to the Press
    • What backers get in return
  3. After the workshop

  4. Campaign video production: SC CTSI will provide video production support for all researchers and their campaign videos.
  5. Campaign marketing: Experiment and SC CTSI will collaborate to provide support to promote and increase the reach of the campaigns.

Recommended Reading

Research on Crowdfunding

Examples of Successful Crowdfunding Campaigns

Other

FAQ

  • Will I get a certificate after completing this workshop?

    Upon request, participants who complete individual workshops or the entire series will receive a certificate signed by Jonathan M. Samet, MD, MS, Distinguished Professor and Flora L. Thornton Chair, Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Director, USC Institute for Global Health, Director of the SC CTSI Education, Career Development, and Ethics program, and lead instructor Katja Reuter, PhD, director of Digital Strategy and the eHome program at SC CTSI.

  • What resources will I need for this workshop?

    Please bring your computer and your phone. You will need Internet access.

  • What tools will we be using in this workshop?

    We will introduce several crowdfunding platforms used for non-research applications, and then use Experiment’s platform for the hosting of the research campaigns. In addition, we will demonstrate the use of multiple social media tools used primarily for promotion of the campaigns.

Templates

Accelerate the Dissemination and Impact of Your Research Findings

Workshop 3

Training Video and Slides

Introductory Lecture
Training Slides
Slides

Workshop Description

In this workshop, you will learn how to use web-based approaches and social media to accelerate the dissemination and impact of your research findings.

Today, researchers have to make their publications stand out from the stack of nearly 800,000 science and engineering manuscripts that are published each year.

The good news is that there have never been more tools available that allow scientists to communicate their research proactively. Digital and social media make it easier for scientists to break out of the traditional science news cycle and track their impact to advance their careers.

In this workshop, we will explore a range of tools to help you to share your research outputs more broadly via digital and social media, e.g., scientific articles, data, software code, presentations, images, video, infographics.

We will introduce web-based approaches that help you to stay abreast of events and news related to your research and to better understand your audience and speak their language, and we will look at citation guidelines of online and social media content.

Instructor

Katja Reuter, PhD, director of Digital Strategies and the electronic Home program, Southern California Clinical and Translational Science Institute (SC CTSI)

Syllabus

  1. Dissemination of Science: Thinking Beyond Self-Promotion
    • Understand research outputs you can share.
    • Understand digital distribution and the spoke-hub model.
    • Understand how to use tools that help you to share your research outputs more broadly via digital and social media, e.g., scientific articles, data, software code, presentations, images, video, infographics.
  2. Audience Research
    • Use web-based tools to better understand your audience.
    • Use keyword search to understand how your audience relates to and talks about topics, e.g., health issues, diseases, treatments, science.
    • Use web-based tools to discover hashtags that allow you to gauge your potential reach and join existing conversations among online communities.
    • Use web-based tools to discover what platforms your target audience uses.
  3. Content Distribution
    • Understand successful online approaches to disseminate content. Examples: Understand how to use Twitter for broader reach. Understand how to create infographics.
    • Use tools to manage your content distribution efficiently.
    • Relate your content to current events and news. Use web-based tools to stay abreast of news in your field.
    • Use web-based tools to explain and enrich your scientific articles for broader reach.
  4. Citations
    • Understand and use social media content citation guidelines.
    • Understand and apply online data citation guidelines.

Recommended Reading

Dissemination of Science

Audience research

Twitter

FDA Social Media Guidelines

Social Media Citations

Data Citations

Infographics

Kudos

FAQ

  • Will I get a certificate after completing this workshop?

    Upon request, participants who complete individual workshops or the entire series will receive a certificate signed by Jonathan M. Samet, MD, MS, Distinguished Professor and Flora L. Thornton Chair, Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Director, USC Institute for Global Health, Director of the SC CTSI Education, Career Development, and Ethics program, and lead instructor Katja Reuter, PhD, director of Digital Strategy and the eHome program at SC CTSI.

  • What resources will I need for this workshop?

    Please bring your computer and your phone. You will need Internet access.

  • What tools will we be using in this workshop?

    We will introduce and use several digital and social media approaches and tools.

Materials

Utilize Digital and Social Media Data for Your Research

Workshop 4

Training Video and Slides

Training Video
Training Slides
Slides
Symplur Interview

Workshop Description

Today, over 80 percent of Americans seek health information online and nearly 70 percent of all Internet users in the United States use digital and social media. These numbers are increasing, even among diverse and underserved populations. This trend provides huge opportunities for researchers.

For example, did you know that African Americans have exhibited relatively high levels of Twitter use? Fully 40% of 18-29 year old African Americans who use the Internet say that they use Twitter. Latinos go online from mobile devices and use social networking sites at similar – and sometimes higher – rates than do other Americans. And, around 81% of lower-income Americans say it is "very important" for the library to provide free access to the Internet and computers? (Pew Research Center, 2013, 2014)

Attendees of this workshop will learn how the general public, disease communities, and health care professionals use the Web and social media. They will learn about the potential and limitations of using the resulting ‘digital traces’ to inform their research and how to design data-driven online outreach strategies to achieve their research goals (e.g., engagement, enrollment).

You will also get access to Symplur Signals, an online application that provides more than 500 million healthcare-related tweets and 185 million user profiles from Twitter, all segmented by thousands of healthcare relevant topics.

The Symplur team will offer a free 30-minute explorative consulting session to each participant tailored to how their own research can leverage social media data.

Instructors

Syllabus

  1. Digital and Social Media Data
    • Why use digital and social media as part of your research?
    • Understand how to use social media data in support of research and study participant recruitment
    • Understand how the general public, disease communities, and health care professionals use the Web and social media
  2. Data Source: Twitter
    • Understand what Twitter user data is available
    • Understand the anatomy of a Twitter messages (tweet)
    • Analyze research studies that have successfully leveraged digital data
  3. Online Data Usage in Research
    • Understand limitations: Protected health information (PHI), de-identification vs. anonymization, online recruitment guidelines, online consent
  4. HealthCare Social Media
    • The Healthcare Hashtag Project
    • Understand where and how to find digital and social media data?
    • Limitations of digital data
  5. Introduction to Symplur Signals
    • Understand what research questions you can answer using Symplur Signals
    • Learn how to leverage Symplur Signals to analyze over 500 million healthcare social media data points in real time
    • Identify relevant healthcare communities on Twitter and learn how to seek out top influencers of all stakeholder types (providers, patients, etc.)
    • Understand the dynamics of each community from content analysis and network centrality analysis of the relationships

Recommended Reading

Usage of digital and social media

Digital and social data mining

Online Outreach and Participant Recruitment

Ethical issues, FDA guidelines, Online consent

FAQ

  • Will I get a certificate after completing this workshop?

    Upon request, participants who complete individual workshops or the entire series will receive a certificate signed by Jonathan M. Samet, MD, MS, Distinguished Professor and Flora L. Thornton Chair, Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Director, USC Institute for Global Health, Director of the SC CTSI Education, Career Development, and Ethics program, and lead instructor Katja Reuter, PhD, director of Digital Strategy and the eHome program at SC CTSI.

  • What resources will I need for this workshop?

    Please bring your computer and your phone. You will need Internet access.

  • What tools will we be using in this workshop?

    We will introduce several digital and social media measurement and listening tools as well as Symplur Signals.

Using Social Media Data to Gain Community Insights and Inform Organizational Strategy

Join us for a special workshop series in collaboration with the popular healthcare social media analytics company Symplur – tailored to students at all levels.

This workshop series will allow you to develop marketable skills to analyze social media data, translate the data into compelling visuals that clearly communicate your key messages, and develop actionable insights that inform organizational strategy. You will be able to apply these skills in practice – for instance, when:

  • Doing marketing research to inform a new product idea;
  • Developing a communication plan; or
  • Conducting a preliminary analysis in support of your research idea.

The three best workshop products (i.e., data analyses and infographics) will be featured in a news story and on the Symplur blog.

Instructors

Invitation Flyer

Using Social Media Data to Gain Insights into Community Trends

Workshop 1

Training Video

Symplur Signals Demonstration
Symplur Demonstration

Workshop Description and Syllabus

In this workshop, you will learn how to use social media data (social media listening) to gain insights into emerging community needs, trends, and conversations.

During the workshop, you will get access to Symplur Signals, a daily updated, growing database of currently of more than 750 million disease- and healthcare-related Twitter user messages (tweets), 6,000 hashtags, 12,000 unique healthcare topics, and 285 million user profiles from Twitter.

Part 1: Using a series of example studies, our partners from Symplur will show you how to best use Symplur Signals and explain what types of questions can be answered leveraging this type of social media data.

Part 2: Attendees will work in groups of four to complete one of the proposed analysis projects and develop data reports. Please see the section Student Data Analysis Projects for more detail.

Deadline workshop 1: Please submit your final data analysis and report by Tuesday, March 10 prior to the second workshop. Send it to katja.reuter@usc.edu.

Syllabus

  • Understand how to use digital and social media data, focused on more than 750 million Twitter user messages (tweets)
  • Understand how to use that data to identify emerging healthcare, disease and health trends at the local and national levels as well as potential study participants for research projects
  • Understand what types of questions digital and social media data can help answer
  • Understand the use of hashtags (#) in online conversations on Twitter
  • Understand privacy guidelines for using that data in support of your work and research (e.g., protected health information, de-identification vs. anonymization)
  • Develop experience in using the Symplur Signals database to answer research questions

Pre-Workshop Reading

Understanding how individuals and communities talk about healthcare issues, diseases, and health concerns can provide valuable insights that inform multiple areas of work such as business, communications and marketing, social work, medicine, arts, and research. However, this type of knowledge is scarce.

Social media listening describes the analysis of online user conversations. It is being used by the pharmaceutical industry, marketers, and a limited number of researchers who have used manual and computerized approaches to gain insights from social media data (e.g., Lyles et al., 2013 ; Pawelek et al., 2014).

Online disease/health communities are growing, and they are particularly active on the microblogging social media platform Twitter – as evidenced by the growing number of disease-related conversations on Twitter and Symplur’s popular hashtag projects (disease-focused , healthcare-focused). For example, did you know that between June 2012 and October 2014, 13,372 users who self-identified as located in Los Angeles sent 35,295 messages on Twitter using the word “diabetes” in more than a dozen languages, including English, Spanish, Tagalog, Haitian, Korean, and Vietnamese (Symplur Signals)?

Please view and study the following materials prior to the workshop:

Student Data Analysis Projects

Symplur Signals Demonstration
Symplur Demonstration

Please choose one of the following case studies. You will work in groups of four to complete one of the proposed analysis projects and to develop a data report.

Analysis Project #1

You are doing marketing research for a healthcare firm that is exploring the potential for a new product idea. The product, a continuous blood glucose monitoring (CGM) device, is designed to be as minimally invasive as possible and to communicate directly with patients’ smartphone devices. You are in charge of gathering novel insights into perceptions of the various healthcare stakeholders and decide to leverage social media data. You focus your analysis on the following aspects/questions:

  • Who is participating in these conversations and what can you learn about them and their communities?
  • What languages are the conversations in?
  • Where (locations in the U.S.) are the conversations regarding CGM taking place on Twitter?
  • How do they reference CGM? What can you say about their perception of currently available practices for monitoring glucose level?
  • Identify examples of CGM-related pain points that users express?
  • What resources regarding CGM are being shared and who are the sources? How influential are they?
  • Describe the opportunity that exists in the market for a new CGM device for direct integration with patients’ smartphone devices. In what areas could it potentially improve healthcare for patients, providers and other third parties?

Analysis Project #2

You have started a new job in a non-profit organization that is focused on increasing childhood vaccination rates for measles in the U.S. Your new supervisor gives you the opportunity to showcase your skills and independently develop a proposed communications plan. S/he asks you to support your recommendation with data but within the organization no market communication data is available. You decide to tap into social media data to develop a data-driven communications plan. You focus your analysis on the following aspects/questions:

  • What can you learn about parents’ (target audience) perspectives on the measles vaccination? Are there different communities to be considered for the planned outreach?
  • What topics are being discussed?
  • What languages are being used?
  • Is there a particular time when the target audience is active online?
  • Who are key influencers among the target audience that are active on Twitter? Are all stakeholders engaged in the discussions?
  • How do the various stakeholders communicate? What different communications styles are being used?
  • What concerns and fears do parents express regarding measles vaccinations? How are they being addressed? Are there any positive stories being told?
  • Do they share resources? What are the sources?
  • Should the non-profit partner with any other active and influential organizations in these communities?
  • Based on the insight you can glean from Twitter social media data, what overall approach would you recommend for communicating to the target audience?

Analysis Project #3

You are a student in a research lab. You have been thinking about proposing a new research idea to your supervisor. You want to find out more about how patients living with chronic pain may or may not openly express their condition and how providers, caretakers, family and friends can deepen their understanding, thereby better supporting those patients. To strengthen your case, you have decided to conduct a preliminary analysis using social media data. By providing preliminary insight into the following questions, you want to persuade your supervisor to apply for funding in support of a broader study. You focus your analysis on the following aspects/questions:

  • What communities on social media exist that chronic pain patients are part of?
  • Find out why chronic pain patients choose to join these communities.
  • How has the activity level of these online communities changed over time?
  • Are all stakeholders (patients, providers, caretakers, family and friends) present in these communities? How do they communicate differently from each other?
  • Can you detect different languages?
  • Where are people who participate in these online conversations located?
  • Describe the interactions between the participants.
  • What topics do they discuss? Are the discussions professional or personal in nature, involving how we may change and improve healthcare?
  • What unique insight can you glean that a typical healthcare provider visit may not pick up on?
  • What value may these communities bring to the patients? To the providers? To family and friends? Should you consider them in your research plan?

Deadline workshop 1: Please submit your final data analysis and report by Tuesday, March 10, 2015 prior to the second workshop. Send it to katja.reuter@usc.edu.

Q&A Forum

Please post your comments and questions about your data analysis projects, how to use Symplur Signals, the workshop in general, etc. on our workshop discussion forum so that all students can benefit from the knowledge we generate together.

You can also join our conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #DigiScholar15

P.S. Thanks to the Symplur team for creating the forum!

Helpsheets and Templates

Creating Compelling Infographics

Workshop 2

Training Video and Slides

Training Video
Training Video
Training Slides
Slides
Easel.ly Demo Video
Easel.ly Demo Video

Workshop Description and Syllabus

In this workshop, you will learn how to create compelling infographics that help you better articulate your key findings using a data-driven approach.

We will discuss the characteristics of successful infographics. Then, student working groups will have the opportunity to use Easel.ly, a free infographic software tool, to convert their data report into compelling infographics.

Deadline workshop 2: Each group will have time to refine and finish their infographic and is asked to submit their final product by Wednesday, March 18th, 2015.

Syllabus

  • Understand the concept of using infographics to communicate data-rich findings and a range of available tools
  • Understand the strengths and limitations of infographics
  • Use an infographic software tool (Easel.ly) to develop an infographic and communicate your data report findings effectively

Further Workshop Reading

Infographic Examples

Helpsheets and Templates

Student Workshop Projects: Infographics

Peer Evaluation

All students who participated in the work groups and submitted an infographic based on their social media data reports will get a chance to anonymously evaluate each other's infographics to determine the three winners, who will be featured in a news story and on the Symplur blog.

Why student peer evaluation? While evaluating the work of their peers, students have the opportunity to be exposed to the work of others, explore new ways of thinking about a topic and both refine and reflect on their own understanding.

View the Peer Evaluation page

Certificate of Completion

Participants who complete both workshops will receive a certificate signed by Jonathan M. Samet, MD, MS, Distinguished Professor and Flora L. Thornton Chair, Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Director, USC Institute for Global Health, Director of the SC CTSI Education, Career Development, and Ethics program, Symplur, and the lead instructor Katja Reuter, PhD, director of Digital Strategy and the eHome program at SC CTSI.