The Mentored Career Development in Clinical and Translational Science (MCD-CTS) is a three-year program created to support research career development for health professionals or individuals with research doctoral degrees who wish to pursue formal training and a career in clinical and translational research.

The SC CTSI Workforce Development (WD) group has funding through the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to award up to four Clinical and Translational Research candidates every year. Scholars will be provided an opportunity to acquire and refine the core knowledge and skill sets needed to become future clinical translational investigators, and be taught the skills to complete a grant that would have a high probability of being funded.

The fundamental training and career development elements revolve around structured didactic coursework; monthly seminars in the design, conduct and analysis of clinical research in a team-based setting; engagement in related career development activities (e.g., conferences and a mentoring program); and hands-on conduct of a research project under the supervision of mentors. Scholars are selected by a committee, which considers the applicant's prior training, research, and commitment to a clinical or translational research career, as well as potential to excel in the program. Scholars are encouraged to obtain an advanced degree in the Master of Science in Clinical, Translational, and Biomedical Investigations (CBTI) from the Keck School of Medicine of USC which requires completion of the required 29 units of coursework or they may obtain a Certificate for completion of 15 units.

Apply Now Awardees

Contact information

Workforce Development at SC CTSI

(323) 442‑8281

View Email

If you are interested in finding out more information about MCD-CTS Program, contact us for more information.

NIH Funding Acknowledgment: Important - All publications resulting from the utilization of SC CTSI resources are required to credit the SC CTSI grant by including the NIH funding acknowledgment and must comply with the NIH Public Access Policy.